Award Winners / Artist Profile

About the Artist

Amontaine Aurore is a writer, actor and performance artist and author of several plays produced throughout Washington, nationally and abroad. In the summer of 2016, her play, Don’t Call it a Riot! was chosen to receive a workshop and public reading from Theatre Battery in Kent, Washington. Her solo play Free Desiree, has been produced in various venues throughout Seattle, as well as at the New York Fringe Festival, and her newest solo play, Love Letters Beyond the Veil, premiered at the Orcas Center Mainstage on Orcas Island, and will make its New York debut in November 2016 at the United Solo Theatre Festival. Amontaine has been a writer-in-residence at the Hedgebrook Writers’ Retreat on Whidbey Island and is the recipient of several artist grants from Artist Trust, Seattle Office of Arts and Culture, 4Culture, and the Puffin Foundation.

Amontaine received 2016 GAP funding for Don’t Call it a Riot!, the first in a trilogy of plays she is writing about social activism in the Pacific Northwest. The play focuses on two distinct time periods in Seattle: 1968 and 1999, exploring both the internal and external factors that cause the demise of a movement, and the subsequent effect that loss can have on one’s life, and on the lives of future generations. Aurore's research developed over a year, and included interviews with Aaron Dixon, founder of the Seattle Chapter of the Black Panther Party, Norm Stamper, Seattle Police Chief at the time of the WTO and Aaron Wood, one of the activists at the WTO demonstrations. As a writer, her goal is to continue to create solo work for herself as a performer, and also to expand her reach into writing and producing ensemble pieces that address the contemporary concerns of the day.

Information included above was provided by artist at the time of application.
From the Artist

It is incredibly affirming to receive the Artist Trust GAP Grant at this stage in my career. We writers work so often in isolation, and it is these moments of acknowledgement that are so very important in gauging how the work is being received, and giving that much needed impetus to keep moving forward. Thank you very much!

Amontaine Aurore