Award Winners / Artist Profile

About the Artist

Margie Livingston (Seattle) received her M.F.A. in painting from the University of Washington. Her awards include a residency at the Shenzhen Fine Art Institute in Shenzhen, China, in 2008; a Fulbright Scholarship in 2001, the Arts Innovator Award in 2010, the Neddy Fellowship in Painting in 2010, the Betty Bowen Annual Memorial Award in 2006, and a 2012 CityArtist Project award from Seattle’s Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs. She is represented by Greg Kucera Gallery in Seattle and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles. Livingston’s work resides in the permanent collections of the Shenzhen Fine Art Institute, the Seattle Art Museum, the City of Seattle, King County, and the Henry Art Gallery.

Margie received a 2012 GAP to purchase paint. Margie makes objects that blur the lines between painting and sculpture, between abstract art and figurative art, and often between concrete art and conceptual art. Using acrylic paint Margie creates objects that simulate the properties of wood. Paint “logs” are rolled-up sheets of acrylic paint which are then “milled” producing pieces of acrylic lumber and sheets of “waferboard.” The process requires large quantities of acrylic paint. Currently Margie is preparing for a show at the Bellevue Arts Musuem.

Margie received a 2008 GAP to purchase theatre lighting for her studio. Margie builds structures in her studio and lights them with both warm and cool light in order to consider the intermingling of light, color, and form as they move through space. The combination of warm and cool light creates what she calls a “visual vibration,” which she captures in paint. The resulting work exists between abstraction and representation and new lighting will assist her in expanding her evolving body of work.

Margie received a 2004 GAP to help defray expenses while undertaking a four-week residency this summer. The residency will help to develop and expand current work into new and different directions in preparation for a solo show at Greg Kucera Gallery. “Having uninterrupted studio time is crucial to identifying and developing new ideas. I’ve slowed down the painting process—committing to each stroke and its relationship to the whole before moving on to the next. I’m trying to make each daub of paint contain location, drawing, gravity, color, and light—studying how each mark informs the rectangle. My work is a search for equivalencies and resonance.“

Information included above was provided by artist at the time of application.